jodhpur most popular place

Mehrangarh Fort: Situated on a steep hill, Mehrangarh fort is one of the largest forts in India. The beauty and the grandeur of numerous palaces in the fort narrates a saga of hard sandstones yielding to the chisels of skilled Jodhpuri sculptures. Mehrangarh Fort, spreading over 5 km on a perpendicular hill and looking down 125 meters, presents a majestic view on city horizon. It was built on advice of a saint in 1459 to establish an impregnable head-quarter.

This Fort is one of the best in India with its exquisitely latticed windows, carved panels, elaborately adorned windows and walls of Moti Mahal, Phool Mahal, Sheesh Mahal. A collection of musical instruments, palanquins, royal costumes, furniture and the cannons on the fort's ramparts are well preserved.

Mehrangarh Fort

Jaswant Thada: Close to the fort complex, lies Jaswant Thada. This 19th century royal cenotaph built in white marble in commemoration of Maharaja Jaswant Singh II and three other cenotaphs, stand nearby. The cenotaph of Maharaja Jaswant Singh holds the rare portraits of the rulers and Maharajas of Jodhpur. A visit inside the cenotaphs, with some villagers of the region, would bring forward the reverence they still hold for their brave kings

Jaswant Thada

Umaid Bhawan Palace: Romantic looking Umaid Bhawan Palace was actually built with the purpose of giving employment to the people of Jodhpur during a long drawn famine. The royal family of Jodhpur still lives in a part of the palace.Another part of the palace houses a well-maintained museum, displaying an amazing array of items belonging to the Maharaja and the royal family - weapons, antiques & fascinating clocks, crockery and trophies

Umaid Bhawan Palace

Umed Garden: Umed garden covers an area of 82 acres. developed by Maharaja Umed Singh, it has green lawns, towering Ashoka trees, roses and seasonal flowers, museum, fountains, library and a zoo.In 1978 'Walk-in Aviary' was constructed there one could see different types of birds, local, African and Australian parrots, ducks, rabbits etc; in their natural environment. There are large cages for bears, foxes, deers, lions leopard etc. It is place frequented by children and adults with equal interest.

Umed Garden

Raj Ranchhodji Temple: It was made by queen Jadechi Rajkanwar after the death of her husband, king Jaswant Singh. Major Part of the temple is made of red sandstone, carved with beautiful filigree work. The heart of the temple has the statue of Ranchhodji made of black marble.It has green, yellow and blue glassess fixed on its main door.

Raj Ranchhodji Temple

Achal Nath Shivalaya: Achal Nath Shivalaya was constructed by Nanak Devi, queen of Rao Ganga. The construction was completed on 21st May 1531. A large water reservoir called Bawari was made near the Shivlinga which is known as Ganga Bawari. The Garbh Griha, Mandap and Kirtan Bhawan of the temple are made of carved Chhitar stone.

Achal Nath Shivalaya

Siddhnath Mahadev: Siddhnath Shiv temple is located between Takhat Sagar hills. On the road going from the right of filter house on Jodhpur-Chopasani Road, on crossing the stairs made by cutting rocks, one can reach Siddhnath temple. Many years ago it was an absolutely deserted place. And because of that, a hermit Veetragi Narain Swami started staying here. He was a highly worshipped and respected saint, known in the nearby areas. Once a handicapped saint named Gaurishanker, later known as Nepali Baba, came to this place. He had only four fingers in each of his hand and foot. He made a big temple by cutting stones, which is now known as Siddhnath.

Siddhnath Mahadev

Ganesh Temple:The area which is called Ratanada was named after a dog called Rata. About 150 years ago a teacher Radidas in a place called Gorunda saw a statue of Vinayakji in the hills of Ratanada. The statue is eight feet high and five feet wide.

Ganesh Temple

Ossian: 65 Kms from Jodhpur, lies ruins of an ancient city called Ossian. This city is famous for Brahmanical and Jain temples, which belong to 8th and 11th century. Surya or Sun temple and the Sachiya temples are famous for their beauty. The shikhar of Sachiya temple is clustered by two rows of turrets, an ambulatory and a large assembly hall with an elaborate ceiling. This town which was once a great trading centre is an oasis and houses an abundance of peacocks. The largest of the 16 Jain and Brahmanical temples is dedicated to Mahavira, the last of the Jain tirthankars. In the same area the Surya temple has fascinating images of Durga, Surya and Ganesh. The sculptural intricacy of the Osian temples rival that of any of the famous temples of the country, be it the Sun Temple of Konark, or the Hoysala temples of Karnataka.

Ossian

Mandore:Towards the north of Jodhpur is the ancient capital of Marwar, Mandore. It is just 8 Kms from the city. Main attractions of the place are hall of Heroes where sixteen huge figures which have been carved out of a single rock, the shrine of 330 million Gods and the royal cenotaphs. This area is of immense historical importance but what makes it worthy of a visit is the Hall of Heroes.

Sixteen gigantic figures carved out of a single rock depicting popular Hindu and folk deities stand there in bright colours and are well maintained. But one can not miss the caves in crags and the sprawling gardens, which are now shelter place for monkeys and peacocks. Greenery of the place makes Mandore, in true sense, an oasis.

Mandore

Balsammand Lake & Palace:Many a times you must have dreamt of staying in a huge, royal palace on the sea-shore or on the banks of river or if not both at least a palace facing the water reservoir. There is such a place at Mandore in Rajasthan .The 19th Century sandstone palace built on a hillock facing Balsammand lake is one of such places that's definitely going to win your heart.The palace was created by Maharajah Sur Singhji, as a summer pavilion. It is very finely carved with latticed windows that allow the soft, cool breeze to blow into the interiors of the palace. The embankments of the lake, in front of the palace, have domed structure that offers fabulous views of the lake encircled by hills. An artificial cascading waterfall, brings water down from the reservoir to the gardens. Mandore, is a part of Jodhpur but it enjoys the calmness by being far from the city crowd.

Balsammand Lake & Palace

Kaylana Lake: Located 8 kms. West of Jodhpur, Kaylana lake was constructed in 1872 by Pratap Singh. It is spread over 84 square kilometers' area. Earlier this area had palaces and gardens made by two rulers of Jodhpur-Bhim Singh and Takhat Singh. These were destroyed to make Kaylana lake. Near the lake is a Dak Bungalow of PHED. Boating facilities have also been made available for tourists

Kaylana Lake

Jodhpur history

Jodhpur, the heart of Rajasthan and the majestic jewel of her eternal crown, iluminate the Thar, enriching the desert with enterpreneurship, scholarship and art. According to Rathore tradition, the clan traces its origins back to the Hindu god, Rama, hero of the epic Ramayana, and thence to the sun. So the Rathore's belong to the Suryavansha (solar race) branch of the Kshatriyas, the warrior caste of Hindus. Later, breaking into historical reality, in 470 A.D. Nayal Pal conquered the kingdom of Kanauj, near modern Kanpur in Uttar Pradesh. The Rathor capital for seven centuries, Kanauj fell in 1193 to the Afghan invader's led by Muhammad Ghori.

 

The fleeing ruler, Jai Chand was drowned in the Ganga. But his son Siyaji, had better luck. An expedient marriage alliance between the Rathore Sihaji and the sister of a local prince enabled the Rathors to consolidate themselves in this region. In fact, they prospered to such a degree that they managed to oust the Pratiharas of Mandore, nine km to the north of present day Jodhpur.

 

He later set himself up as an independent ruler around the wealthy trading centre of Pali, just south of Jodhpur. His descendants flourished, battled often, won often, and in 1381 Rao Chanda ousted the Parihars from Mandore which then became the Rathore seat of government.Rathore fortunes then turned for better. Rao Chanda's son and heir, Rainmal, won praise for his capture of Ajmer and was then entrusted with the care of his orphaned nephew, destined to inherit the Mewar throne of Chittor. Rainmal may well have had his eyes on this fine, hilltop fort. But court intrigue and treachery stopped him. In 1438 he was doped with opium, and finally shot dead.

This triggered bitter feuds, ending with Mewar and Marwar becoming separate states.Rathore legend continues in various versions. One is that Jodha, one of Rainmal's 24 sons, fled Chittor and finally, 15 years later, recaptured Mandore in 1453. Five years later he was acknowledged as ruler. A holy man sensibly advised him to move his capital to hilltop safety.

 

By 1459, it became evident that a more secure headquarters was required. The high rocky ridge nine km to the south of Mandore was an obvious choice for the new city of Jodhpur, with the naturaly enhanced by a fortress of staggering proportions, and to which Rao Jodha's successors added over the centuries.

Rao Ganga Singh of Jodhpur (reigned 1516-32) fought alongside the army of the great warrior king of Mewar, Rana Sanga, against the first Mughal emperor, Babur. But over the next half century, the rulers of Jodhpur allied themselves with Babur's grandson, Akbar. Several rulers of Jodhpur became trusted lieutenants of the Mughals, such as Raja Surender, who conquered Gujarat and much of the Deccan for Akbar, and Raja Gaj Singh, who put down the rebellion of the Mughal prince, Khurram, against his father, Jahangir. With the support of the Mughals, the court of Jodhpur flourished and the kingdom became a great centre of the arts and culture.

 

In the 17th century Jodhpur became a flourishing centre of trade for the camel caravans moving from Central Asia to the parts of Gujarat and vice versa. In 1657, however, Maharaja Jaswant Singh (reigned 1638-78) backed the wrong prince in the great war of succession to the Mughal throne. He was in power for almost twenty-five years with Aurangzeb before he was sent out to the frontier as viceroy in Afghanistan. Aurangzeb then tried to seize his infant son, but loyal retainers smuggled the little prince out of his clutches, hidden, they say, in a basket of sweets.

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